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Seller Inspection

A home inspection is traditionally known as a part of the due diligence process when a home is under contract with an intended buyer. A professional home inspector will visit the home and conduct a thorough review of the structure, noting any deferred maintenance, defects in the building and the remaining useful life of major appliances and systems such as the air conditioner and water heater.

Depending on what the inspector finds, the results can have a powerful impact on the sale of the house. The buyer can ask for repairs or updates to be made, try negotiating on the sale price or walk away from the deal.

To avoid the unpleasant surprises a home inspection may bring to light, homeowners looking to put their house on the market can opt for a prelisting home inspection, which provides sellers with a thorough report before the home goes on the market. Sellers have the opportunity to make necessary repairs before potential buyers start touring the property and to avoid a deal that falls through due to structural or maintenance problems that could lead to other potential buyers steering clear of a property that has issues.

Even in a hot real estate market where buyers are snapping up available homes quickly, a prelisting inspection can help reduce the chances a deal could fall through and get you closer to selling your home for the price you want in the time frame you need.

Here are five reasons you should consider a prelisting home inspection before putting your house on the market.

  1. Advance notice. Every house comes with its fair share of quirks and problems, and you're probably at least vaguely aware of a few of them – a window that lets water in when it rains or bowing floorboards in one corner of the dining room, for example. If you're planning to put your property on the market, an inspection report ahead of time will help you see all the potential problems together, including some you may not have known about.The prelisting inspection gives you the knowledge to do with it what you will – make repairs or updates or reflect any deferred maintenance in your sale price, Sellers will have all the cards – they're not going to be blindsided by any major finds from the buyer's inspection.

 

  1. DIY option. For simple repairs, however, the prelisting inspection gives you the added benefit of being able to take on projects yourself. When negotiating with a buyer, necessary repairs will typically require you to bring in professionals for all work done, even when the fixes are simple.There's a lot of do-it-yourself projects that the homeowner can do where it's satisfactory, it's not going to be an issue. If the buyer's inspector finds it – let's say there's an electrical outlet that needs to be replaced or some simple plumbing – they're going to typically mandate that a professional electrician or plumber do it. An outlet replacement or tightening a washer on a faucet – both simple projects homeowners can do – could be a couple hundred dollars for a pro to complete.

 

  1. Contractor of choice. For those bigger projects that do require professionals to come out, time is also on your side when your home isn't yet on the market. You get time to use the contractors you want. Rather than needing to find a roofer in a specific time frame to appease the buyer, you can shop around for the right price, availability and skill to ensure you're satisfied with the work.

 

  1. Informed pricing. Of course, there are some projects you're just not willing to take on. If you can't afford to fix a foundation issue with your house or you don't want to invest the money to replace cracked tile in a bathroom when you know a buyer will completely renovate it anyway, you don't necessarily have to take care of the repairs. Instead, that can be reflected in the price. Work with your real estate agent to establish the right sale price, taking into account whatever issues you can't – or aren't willing to – fix before putting the house on the market. Your final sale price will be lower, but it may be better than paying for repairs that won't be fully recouped by a buyer's offer. 

 

  1. Buyer may accept results. The fact that your house has already had an inspection can have its own appeal for buyers and can serve as a plus if included in marketing descriptions of the house. Especially in a tight seller's market where buyers have to fiercely compete with each other, you may see more buyers willing to accept the prelisting inspection report and forgo an additional inspection during the due diligence period, moving the process along faster.


The typical inspection takes 3-6 hours. Using a range of investigative tools we will inspect your home from top to bottom, including:

 

  • General safety and security
  • All rooms in the interior living space
  • Building design, framing and structure
  • Foundations, basements and crawl spaces
  • Attics, garages, stairs, steps
  • Exterior walls, siding, trim, windows, doors
  • Roof coverings, drainage systems, skylights, vents and ventilation
  • Chimneys, fireplaces
  • Walkways, patios, decks and driveways
  • Perimeter drainage
  • Electrical service
  • Water piping & valves, gas piping & valves
  • Hot water supply
  • Sinks, toilets, tubs, showers
  • Heating systems, cooling systems, humidifiers, air filters
  • Electrical panels, wires, wiring, outlets, switches, lighting fixtures, and ceiling fans
  • Custom installations, such as saunas or hot tubs
  • Previous repairs